About Suar Wood

Suar wood, synonymous with Albizia Saman, is native to the Neo-Tropics, Central America, and to Brazil.  But it has been widely introduced to South and Southeast Asia. 

Vernacular names :  Rain Tree, 雨树, 雨豆树, モンキーポッド

Synonyms – Albizia Saman, Samanea Saman, Suar Wood, Monkey Pod, East Indian Walnut

The Suar Wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 

Wood Characteristics

Albizia Saman is a tree that grows to 50-80 feet tall, its wide canopy forms an umbrella-like crown spreading to 100 feet in diameter.  The leaves fold in rainy days and in the evening. 

The Wood colour tends to be golden to dark brown, sometimes with darker streaks.  Sapwood is usually thin and yellow/white, clearly demarcated from the heartwood.  Suar Wood is often seen with highly figured curly or wild grain patterns. 

Traditional Use

In Central America, ox-cart wheels are made from cross sections of the trunks. Other tropical countries use it for boat building, furniture, general constructions, and paneling. Making hats out of shavings from Albizia Saman is also done in the Philippines.

Wood Maintainance

Suar Wood Tables are resilient. Rated as highly durable against decay resistance, Suar Wood is also resistant to most insect attacks. But that doesn’t mean they should be treated carelessly.

Frequent dusting using a soft cloth or a vacuum cleaner with a dust brush attachment should be performed. This will prevent dust from sticking to its surface. 

Avoid placing hot objects directly onto the wood. A sturdy wood or plastic coaster should be able to protect it from any heat damage.

Using coasters or mats when placing anything atop the furniture is also advised. Even so, be mindful that metal coasters can ‘sweat’ onto the wood and some plastic coasters can react with certain wood furniture finishes.

Be careful with strong-coloured liquids, like coffee and wine, around your wooden furniture. Any accidental spillage on the wood should be immediately cleaned with a cloth using a blotting rather than a wiping action.

Exposure to extreme temperature and ultraviolet light can damage the wood. Avoid placing wood furniture outdoors unless otherwise specified. Extreme humidity or lack thereof can also spoil the shape of the wood furniture.

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